A Day on Green Turtle Cay

Our boat is docked in the Bluff House Resort and Marina on White Sound in Green Turtle Cay (pronounced, by the way, “key“). After two days here, I have a few thoughts. First of all, the staff is outstanding. Everyone – from Andrew the dockhand, to Cynthia, the manager, to our waitresses, to the front desk people – are so kind and helpful. I have nothing but positives to say about the people here. We’ve had multiple offers by staff members to transport us in their own personal vehicles (i.e., golf carts), if we needed a ride. We’ve had two meals at the Jolly Roger restaurant, lunch yesterday and dinner today. The food has been fantastic. The private beach associated with the resort is also beautiful and inviting. The wifi, for the most part, has been good with a reasonable signal. We have been kicked off a couple of times, but usually all is needed is to sign back in.

Beatitude from the pool deck

Beatitude from the pool deck

The negatives probably have as much to do with the season, than with the resort, although the facility has recently undergone a change in management and appears to have been poorly managed for some time. I was unaware that this is the slow season here in the Bahamas. Old Bahama Bay, at West End, had very few guests, which was surprising to me. The resort here at Bluff House has no guests at this time, and their are only four sailboats in the marina. I guess that the busy season kicks in the week after Christmas. Many cruisers are not allowed by their insurance company to be as far south as Florida until after December 1, due to Hurricane threats. Things really heat up, I am told, around the first week of January, and then everyone is busy into July. So, the negatives: The pool here has no water in it. It is being serviced and they are waiting on a pump to be brought in from the states. Since it is so slow, this is the time for maintenance and repairs. The beach bar/restaurant wasn’t open. Laundry is outrageously expensive (probably a Bahamian problem and not a Bluff House problem). Overall, however, we are pleased, especially for $499/month!

Christmas tree in the Jolly Roger

Christmas tree in the Jolly Roger

Today, one of the helpful staff members took us over to Green Turtle Club where we rented a Golf Cart for the day. Golf carts are the preferred means of getting around on the island, which is only 3 miles long and 1/2 mile wide. Green Turtle Cay was founded in the 1700s by New England Settlers, loyalists (those who were loyal to the Crown during the American Revolution) who fled here after the colonies emerged victorious. They were granted land here by King George for their loyalty. Many of the homes in New Plymouth, the main town on the island, have a New England appearance. We took the golf cart into New Plymouth (the main town on the island, parked it and walked around town for a bit.

Marina personnel giving us a ride to pick up our golf cart

Marina personnel giving us a ride to pick up our golf cart

Our ride on the island

Our ride on the island

The main road is dirt from Green Turtle Club to Bluff House, but paved on the rest of the island.

The main road is dirt from Green Turtle Club to Bluff House, but paved on the rest of the island.

Our first stop was the almost 200 year-old Albert Lowe museum. Albert was a well-respected carver of model boats and his son, Alton, is a well-known Bahamian artist. The museum had several works of each man as well as information on the history of the island. The decor was 18th/early 19th century. After leaving the museum, we walked through the entire town (which didn’t take long), stopping at the grocery store for a snack, the local cemetery to satisfy my morbid curiosity, and, of course, at Miss Emily’s Blue Bee Bar, (on the recommendation of Capt. Roy Rogers), which was started by Miss Emily a year before my birth, 1957 . There we partook of the famous Goombay Smash, a delicious tropical concoction invented in this small little bar in the 1960s. Unfortunately, Miss Emily’s daughter, who now runs the place, would not divulge the recipe.

Entering New Plymouth

Entering New Plymouth

Cindy, upstairs in the bedroom area of the Lowe Museum

Cindy, upstairs in the bedroom area of the Lowe Museum

Some of the work of Alton Lowe. These two ladies were among the first settlers to the Abacos

Some of the work of Alton Lowe. These two ladies were among the first settlers to the Abacos

The work of Albert Lowe, model ship builder

The work of Albert Lowe, model ship builder

This was our guide for the museum taking us to the kitchen, which was a separate structure in the backyard.

This was our guide for the museum taking us to the kitchen, which was a separate structure in the backyard.

The Albert Lowe Museum

The Albert Lowe Museum

More Architecture

More Architecture

New Plymouth Architecture

New Plymouth Architecture

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The freight ship comes in once a week, on Thursdays (the day we were in town).  All supplies for the island arrive on this ship from Nassau.  It's better to shop on Friday than Wednesday.

The freight ship comes in once a week, on Thursdays (the day we were in town). All supplies for the island arrive on this ship from Nassau. It’s better to shop on Friday than Wednesday.

The one Anglican church on Green Turtle Cay

The one Anglican church on Green Turtle Cay

Miss Emily's Blue Bee Bar

Miss Emily’s Blue Bee Bar

Miss Emily's daughter carrying on the Goombay Smash tradition

Miss Emily’s daughter carrying on the Goombay Smash tradition

We added our boat card to the wall (twice, once in the other picture here)

We added our boat card to the wall (twice, once in the other picture here)

A sailor's grave

A sailor’s grave

On the way back to Bluff House, we made several stops along the Atlantic side of the island, taking in the breathtaking beauty of the blue-green waters, soft sandy beaches, and majestic breaking waves. It truly was what one imagines when one thinks of a tropical paradise. After returning to Beatitude, we did a few odds and ends in preparation for our departure back to the U.S. the following day. We had a final delicious Bahamian dinner at the Jolly Roger and retired to the boat.

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4 thoughts on “A Day on Green Turtle Cay

  1. Beautiful pictures..looks like a lovely quaint town. Glad you ended up going farther with Deb & Gord and on to the destination you wanted before you left for the states. 🙂 can’t wait to see you in a week and a half!

    • Rusty, It definitely has some positives. On the downside, though, is not everything was open or providing full service. Still fun.

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