Hope Town to Lynard Cay

The morning following our last of three nights in Hope Town Harbour was punctuated with a little bit of excitement. One of the boats on a mooring just in front and to the left of us started dragging backwards. Apparently, the mooring broke lose. When we looked over he was running into the sailboat behind him, trying to push himself off to avoid damage to his starboard side. In general, cruisers are among the nicest people you’ll meet. Within a couple of minutes, five or six dinghies were in the water to assist, Tracy and I aboard Dali among them. Within five minutes he was safely secured onto another mooring with no obvious damage.

Following this little bit of excitement, the four of us dinghied into Captain Jack’s for internet. We had some drinks and purchased air tickets out the Abacos for Julie and Tracy, and our tickets back to Lakeland for next round of work next week. We walked next door to the little grocery store for a few more provisions before returning to Beatitude. Around 11:30, this morning we released the mooring lines and eased our way out onto the Sea of Abaco.

Captain

Captain

Admiral

Admiral

It was a pleasant cruise southward as we passed Tilloo Cay to port. Our S-shaped route around shallows and sandbars ended about halfway down Lynard Cay where we tucked into a nice anchorage in about 8 feet of the clearest water you could imagine. Just before we were ready to drop anchor, the largest sea turtle we’ve ever seen swam beneath our boat. We dropped anchor in a spot with a sandy beach just off to our north.

"I'm the King of the World!" (along with some laundry hung out to dry)

“I’m the King of the World!” (along with some laundry hung out to dry)

Tracy hanging laundry

Tracy hanging laundry

Tracy at the helm

Tracy at the helm

In 10 feet of water, diving on the anchor to make sure it is set well.

In 10 feet of water, diving on the anchor to make sure it is set well.

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Our anchor embedded in the sea grass off Lynard Cay. By the looks of things, it took about 15 feet to set from where we dropped it at the edge of the grass.

Our anchor embedded in the sea grass off Lynard Cay. By the looks of things, it took about 15 feet to set from where we dropped it at the edge of the grass.

Our 85 lb. anchor buried in sea grass.

Our 85 lb. anchor buried in sea grass.

Looking back at Beatitude from above our anchor.

Looking back at Beatitude from above our anchor.

Tomorrow, if all goes well, we plan to dinghy up to Sandy Cay reef to snorkel. This is supposed to be the best snorkeling spot in all of the northern Bahamas. This will entail all of us being able to climb back into the dinghy from the water. So, we did a test run while at anchor. We each jumped into the cool, clear water and snorkeled for a little bit around our boat and then we each attempted to climb back into the dingy. It was easier for some than others, but the good news is we were all able to get back in. Tomorrow, we snorkel Sandy Cay!

Sunset over Great Abaco Island.

Sunset over Great Abaco Island.

Julie enjoying a beautiful sunset from the hammock in Lynard Cay

Julie enjoying a beautiful sunset from the hammock in Lynard Cay

The day was completed by grilled hot dogs, a game of Jeopardy, and laying out on the foredeck staring up into the vast darkness populated by the innumerable host of heaven. Lynard Cay is isolated and there are no lights on the island, making for perfect conditions for viewing the night sky. We saw stars rarely if ever seen by the average person in the states. We watched a shooting star flash across the sky. “The heavens declare the glory of God… “

5 thoughts on “Hope Town to Lynard Cay

  1. What a beautiful spot for a vacation. Bet the girls really had a good time. Again your photography is spectacular.
    Thanks for sharing

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