Lynard Cay, Abacos

Lynard Cay

Lynard Cay

Friday was spent at Lynard Cay, waiting for a more favorable weather window for crossing to Eleuthera. It was a splendid Bahamian day with bright sun and hardly a cloud in the sky. The temperature rose to the low 70’s. We figured it was a great day to explore the beach by our anchorage.

Shaving off my Sailor's Beard

Shaving off my Sailor’s Beard

Beardless, making music on my ukulele in the cockpit.

Beardless, making music on my ukulele in the cockpit.

So, after a brunch of bacon, eggs, and toast, we climbed into Dalí to dinghy over to the beach. Cindy found a number of small, beautiful shells to add to her collection. We took our beach chairs to the beach with us, and after setting them up close to the water, we sat for a while, soaking up the abundant, warm sunshine. We also took a quick stroll over to the Atlantic side of the Island – a journey of maybe 75 yards. Lynyrd Cay is quite narrow, so from the Sea of Abaco side where we are anchored, we can hear the substantial waves breaking onto the rocky shore and see the spray as it flies high into the air above the trees. Standing on the Atlantic shore was awesome, in the most literal sense of the word. The power of the crashing waves and the rugged beauty of the seashore are awe-inspiring.

The beach behind our anchorage at Lynard Cay

The beach behind our anchorage at Lynard Cay

Lynard Cay beach

Lynard Cay beach

Drifwood.  It made me think of some creature pulling himself up out of the sand.

Drifwood. It made me think of some creature pulling himself up out of the sand.

The Atlantic side of Lynard Cay

The Atlantic side of Lynard Cay

Waves beat against the rocks behind Cindy

Waves beat against the rocks behind Cindy

Looking southward down Lynard Cay.  It's not much wider than this the entire length of the island.  To the right is the Sea of Abaco, to the left is the Atlantic.

Looking southward down Lynard Cay. It’s not much wider than this the entire length of the island. To the right is the Sea of Abaco, to the left is the Atlantic.

Relaxing in beach chairs on our own secluded beach.

Relaxing in beach chairs on our own secluded beach.

After spending time on the beach, we decided to hop back into Dalí and head for Sandy Cay to snorkel, if conditions would allow. We donned our wetsuits and traversed the two and a half miles to Sandy Cay through the chop and swells off the Atlantic (at least after passing the northern most point of Lynard Cay). Unfortunately, it was too rough. There were 3-5 swells coming the Atlantic adding to the already choppy Sea of Abaco. We decided to turn around and head back to Beatitude. To a big kid like me, however, it was still a worthwhile and fun adventure.

Cindy's seashell haul of the day

Cindy’s seashell haul of the day

Last night, there were two other boats with us in the anchorage. They left about mid-morning, and shortly thereafter another catamaran, a Leopard 46 named Delfino (Italian for dolphin), pulled into the anchorage not far from us. While we were on the beach, they dinghied over to exercise their lab-mix named Sadie. The dog’s owners, Fabio and Michelle, hail from Alberta, Canada. They have a lot of experience chartering sailboats in the past, but they just bought their boat and started cruising a month or two ago. They pulled into the Lynard Cay south anchorage for the same reason we did – they are planning to make the passage to Eleuthera tomorrow. So, now we’ll have a “buddy-boat” to sail along with. We’re glad for that.

Delfino and Beatitude (in background) anchored west of Lynard Cay

Delfino and Beatitude (in background) anchored west of Lynard Cay

Sadie on the beach, Delfino in background

Sadie on the beach, Delfino in background

Sadie, chasing tennis balls on the beach

Sadie, chasing tennis balls on the beach

As of now, the passage still looks like a “go.” We’ll have winds from the NNW at 10-15 knots and moderate ocean swells following us south. This will be an open water passage across the Northeast Providence Channel to Eleuthera, the next island chain to the south. We plan to either pick up a mooring ball or anchor in or near Spanish Wells.

Last sunset in the Abacos?

Last sunset in the Abacos?

6 thoughts on “Lynard Cay, Abacos

  1. I love the shells. They are beautiful. I too have a fondness for seashells. I’ve never been to the beach without bringing some home with me. Safe travels.

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