“Hey Y’all” from Savannah – Day Two

Helping the boat behind us push off the dock without hitting Beatitude.

Helping the boat behind us push off the dock without hitting Beatitude.

Just before noon, we were ferried across the Savannah river to the historic city for another day of pleasure. The day began with a visit to The Old Pink House for lunch. Initially called the Habersham House, it opened in 1771. Eventually the soft, native brick bled through the plastered walls, changing the exterior color from white to Jamaican pink. James Habersham, Jr. lived here from 1771-1800. In 1811, it became the first bank in Georgia and was filled with the money of the colonists. The restaurant is a beautiful example of colonial architecture. It also served as the headquarters for Union General Zebulon York in 1865. The food was, of course, delicious.

The Old Pink House

The Old Pink House

Inside The Old Pink House

Inside The Old Pink House

On the Piano in the Cellar Bar at The Old Pink House

On the Piano in the Cellar Bar at The Old Pink House

What a romantic seat in the wine cellar of The Old Pink House

What a romantic seat in the wine cellar of The Old Pink House

Upstairs in the Old Pink House

Upstairs in the Old Pink House

And, yet another room  in The Old Pink House

And, yet another room in The Old Pink House

The rest of the day was spent shopping, visiting art galleries and museums, and eating. We wandered in and out of shops throughout the afternoon, buying little, but looking a lot. We did spend some cash at the Blick Art Supply store, however. I always buy Cindy’s art supplies online through Blick, so we were excited to see a retail store in Savannah. So, we stocked up on a few paints, canvases and brushes. Art galleries were everywhere. It’s always a pleasure to see the works of local artists. While we were visiting one of the galleries, I turned around and noticed Cindy was running out the door. I was wondering what was going on, when the store clerk said that Paula Deen was walking by on the street. Cindy hurried over to meet her. She was unbelievably nice and generous with her time. Her demeanor was unhurried and she seemed like a genuinely kind person. Cindy was so excited to meet her and have her photo taken next to Paula.

We met James in one of the squares.  He was singing in a deep bass voice and making flowers out of straw.  Cool guy!

We met James in one of the squares. He was singing in a deep bass voice and making flowers out of straw. Cool guy!

Selfie in Savannah

Selfie in Savannah

"Hey Y'all!"

“Hey Y’all!”

Mid-afternoon, we visited the Telfair Museum of Art and the Jepson Center. We were excited to see the Bird Girl sculpture in the Jepson. This young lady, cast in bronze and made in 1936 by Sylvia Shaw Judson, is famous for her appearance on the cover of the novel and in the movie of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. She stood over a families plot in the Bonaventure Cemetery in Savannah until 1993, when she was photographed for the cover of the novel. Later, she was moved to the Telfair Museum.

The Telfair Museum

The Telfair Museum

One of the period rooms in the Telfair

One of the period rooms in the Telfair

Don't remember much about the painting, but I like it.

Don’t remember much about the painting, but I like it.

Telfair Square

Telfair Square

Bird Girl

Bird Girl

The Jepson Center also had a very neat exhibit called, The Art of Diplomacy: Winston Churchill and the Pursuit of Painting. It features a number of paintings by Sir Winston Churchill, as well as some of his personal items. The exhibit explores the relationship between his painting and his decision-making as a leader of state.

You can definitely see Cezanne's influence on Churchill in this painting

You can definitely see Cezanne’s influence on Churchill in this painting

Churchill's Palette

Churchill’s Palette

Churchill's traveling easel

Churchill’s traveling easel

One of Churchill’s most important works, a landscape called The Tower of the Katoubia Mosque (1943). The landscape is the only piece that Churchill painted during World War II.  It may have played an important role in the war:  In January of 1943, Churchill secretly met with President Franklin Roosevelt in Casablanca, Morocco to decide the timing of D-Day, the invasion of France.  After days of tough negotiation, Churchill convinced Roosevelt to support a D-Day campaign.  He invited Roosevelt to cement the agreement – which Churchill knew demanded a close personal friendship – over a trip to Marrakech to watch the sun set against the backdrop of the Atlas Mountains. The next day, Churchill painted the daytime view from the same spot, later giving the painting to Roosevelt.   In 2011 Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie bought the painting, which they have loaned to this exhibit.

One of Churchill’s most important works, a landscape called The Tower of the Katoubia Mosque (1943). The landscape is the only piece that Churchill painted during World War II. It may have played an important role in the war: In January of 1943, Churchill secretly met with President Franklin Roosevelt in Casablanca, Morocco to decide the timing of D-Day, the invasion of France. After days of tough negotiation, Churchill convinced Roosevelt to support a D-Day campaign. He invited Roosevelt to cement the agreement – which Churchill knew demanded a close personal friendship – over a trip to Marrakech to watch the sun set against the backdrop of the Atlas Mountains. The next day, Churchill painted the daytime view from the same spot, later giving the painting to Roosevelt. In 2011 Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie bought the painting, which they have loaned to this exhibit.

For dinner, we walked back down to River Street to visit Huey’s on the River, a restaurant which serves New Orleans-style cuisine. We topped off our meal with some delicious beignets, for which Huey’s is known. They were wonderful! My first time having them was at Café du Monde in New Orleans a few years ago. Cindy wasn’t with me, so this was her first experience with these delicious powdered-sugar-coated, deep-fried fritters of deliciousness!

At Huey' on the River

At Huey’ on the River

Around 6 p.m., we ferried back to the Westin marina for the evening. We hung out by the pool for a while, taking a refreshing swim and enjoying wifi in the beautiful evening air. Tonight is our last night in Savannah. Tomorrow, we continue our journey northward. The next destination is Charleston, SC, but we’ll probably take three days to get there, anchoring out each of the next two nights. It may be three days or more before the next post. Until then, we’ll be making our way through the Palmetto State.

Another day comes to an end.

Another day comes to an end.

6 thoughts on ““Hey Y’all” from Savannah – Day Two

  1. Thank you so much, Barry for the tour. We didn’t get to see this beautiful city on the “way down”. Loved the photo of the Little Bird Girl… (Also loved “the book” with her picture on it. 🙂 )

    • Your welcome! It is beautiful! We watched Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil again after leaving Savannah. 🙂

  2. I guess I wasn’t aware that Churchell was so artistic. I’ve had beignets is New Orleans before. Aren’t they sinful ????

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