A Money-Making Interlude

Dawn at Port Annapolis Marina

Dawn at Port Annapolis Marina

I’m back in Portland, Maine while my lovely bride is spending a couple of weeks with family in Barberton, Ohio. Last Friday, Cindy, Christy, and I drove a rental car from Annapolis to Barberton, with a brief stop-over in New Castle, Pennsylvania to visit our youngest daughter, Mariah. It was good to see her and her fiancé, Murilo, once again. I hadn’t been with Mariah since last year. On Saturday, we attended a great birthday bash for Cindy’s sister-in-law, Judy, and her son, Ben. Unfortunately, my time with our Ohio and Pennsylvania family was short, since I had a Sunday morning flight to Maine for work. My flight from Canton-Akron to Portland was another long trial. That’s two consecutive airplane trips in which I’ve had delays and flight cancellations. Fifteen hours after reaching the airport, I arrived, bedraggled, in Maine.

This was my "harbor view" from my room on arrival.  Maine fog.

This was my “harbor view” from my room on arrival. Maine fog.

I’m working eleven ten-hour shifts over thirteen days this time around. As I write, four of the eleven are behind me. Tonight is my one and only overnight shift. I haven’t worked an overnight shift in years, and I am not especially looking forward to this one. But, the summer weather in Maine is gorgeous as usual (although this is the first day I’ve had much time to enjoy it). Today, I went for a two or three mile walk through downtown Portland (the largest city in Maine, although Augusta is the capital.) I had forgotten that we had visited the city on a Fall Colors Tour a few years ago, but all those memories came rushing back as I walked along the waterfront. I had clam chowder and a lobster roll from the Portland Lobster Company. I find I’m on a lobster diet when I visit Maine. I love the Red Claw Pizza (lobster) from the Portland Pie Company in Biddeford. I even tried the lobster roll from McDonalds, and it wasn’t bad!! I stopped by the Sweetgrass Winery and Distillery Old Port Tasting Room for a tasting. The Black River Gin was excellent!

A view of Portland Harbor from my hotel room.  The Portland Museum of Art in the center.

A view of Portland Harbor from my hotel room. The Portland Museum of Art in the center.

Portland Lobster Company

Portland Lobster Company

My view as I ate my lobster roll for lunch today.

My view as I ate my lobster roll for lunch today.

A piece of the Berlin Wall

A piece of the Berlin Wall

Looking up the street from the harbor to city hall

Looking up the street from the harbor to city hall

The Sweetgrass Winery and Distillery Tasting Room

The Sweetgrass Winery and Distillery Tasting Room

Red Claw Pizza.  Mmmmm!!

Red Claw Pizza. Mmmmm!!

McD's Lobster Roll - $7.99

McD’s Lobster Roll – $7.99

Portland Lobster Company Lobster Roll (reportedly the best in Portland) - $16.99

Portland Lobster Company Lobster Roll (reportedly the best in Portland) – $16.99

Across the street from my hotel, which is in downtown Portland, is the Portland Museum of Art. Before returning to my room to relax before my night shift, I decided to stop in for a visit. The strength of this museum’s collection lies in its collection of 19th century American and European art, along with a number of fine, modern art pieces. One of my joys is visiting art museums as I travel.

Kandinsky

Kandinsky

Picasso

Picasso

Renoir (not what I expect when I think of a Renoir, but I really like it)

Renoir (not what I expect when I think of a Renoir, but I really like it)

Gaughin

Gaughin

Corbet

Corbet

"Weatherbeaten" - Winslow Homer

“Weatherbeaten” – Winslow Homer

Jochebed and Moses - Franklin Simmons

Jochebed and Moses – Franklin Simmons

Dead Pearl Diver - Benjamin Paul Akers

Dead Pearl Diver – Benjamin Paul Akers

Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer

A. Bierstadt (I love the contrast of the fiery foliage with the dark ominous background)

A. Bierstadt (I love the contrast of the fiery foliage with the dark ominous background)

Frederic Edwin Church

Frederic Edwin Church

Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer's tools

Winslow Homer’s tools

U.S. Grant by Simmons (designed for the U.S. Capitol rotunda, but wasn't considered heroic enough.  Grant looks too war-warn here).

U.S. Grant by Simmons (designed for the U.S. Capitol rotunda, but wasn’t considered heroic enough. Grant looks too war-warn here).

Andrew Wyeth

Andrew Wyeth

The McLellan House (part of the Portland Museum of Art)).   A three-story Federal-style mansion built in 1801.  I was mesmerized with the central staircase.

The McLellan House (part of the Portland Museum of Art)). A three-story Federal-style mansion built in 1801. I was mesmerized with the central staircase.

DSCN9671

DSCN9672

So, I’ll be here in Maine for another nine days. Meantime, Beatitude is getting all new electronics, including chartplotter, radar, AIS, wind transducer, depth transducer, autopilot, and displays. I’m anxious to get back to see the results, although the marina has emailed me a few pictures. She was hauled out of the water today for that part of the job that required she be on dry land. She is also having her water maker repaired and a port-side holding tank thru-hull repair. During the electronics update, they discovered a potentially dangerous problem with my steering which is also being take care of. Now you know why I need to work for two weeks in Maine. I’ll hopefully provide another update or two before I return to Maryland next weekend.

Our old navigation electronics are out.

Our old navigation electronics are out.

New electronics ready to be installed

New electronics ready to be installed

Our new Garmin Radar is installed

Our new Garmin Radar is installed

Work underway on our new  Garmin chart plotter and gauges at the helm station

Work underway on our new Garmin chart plotter and gauges at the helm station

Until next time…

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Plebes and Midshipmen

The last few days have been spent, for the most part, relaxing in and by the pool. The weather here has been marvelous. I love sitting on the front deck of the boat watching the passing sailboats make their way down Back Creek, on which our marina is located. A little family of ducks with a half-dozen or so ducklings waddle around the dock nibbling for nutrition at the growth on the pilings. There is something romantic about peering out in every direction and seeing a forest of white masts stretching toward the sky. It would be easy to stay here a while and just chill. We’ve made a couple of trips into town for a little eating and shopping, but nothing too strenuous, at least not until today.

The Marina Pool was Great!

The Marina Pool was Great!

Evening time at the Port Annapolis Marina

Evening time at the Port Annapolis Marina

Twilight

Twilight

Downtown Annapolis

Downtown Annapolis

Duck family

Duck family

This morning we toured the United States Naval Academy, whose motto is Ex Scientia Tridens (“Through Knowledge, Sea Power”). Cindy and I had briefly walked across the grounds on a previous visit to the area, but this morning we all joined a guided tour. Our guide was a retired Navy physician named Charles, who (surprisingly, perhaps) was a pediatric gastroenterologist by specialty. He was a very nice and knowledgeable gentlemen. The Naval Academy was established in 1845, and is responsible for training officers for the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Marine Corp (90% of graduates are Naval officers; 10% Marine officers). At this time of year, most of the students, a.k.a. Midshipmen, named after the young people who used to work the middle of a sailing vessel, are off getting hands-on experience on naval vessels around the world. The only students around are the approximately 1300 Plebes (new students), along with a few Midshipmen to help train them and get them ready for their next four years at the Academy.

Standing near Gate 1 at the USNA.

Standing near Gate 1 at the USNA.

They named a gate after me!  Or... maybe not.

They named a gate after me! Or… maybe not.

Plebes outside Lejeune Hall

Plebes outside Lejeune Hall

Liferaft training inside Lejeune Hall

Liferaft training inside Lejeune Hall

The football from every Navy win in the Army/Navy football game, first held in 1890.  Navy has won the last 13.

The football from every Navy win in the Army/Navy football game, first held in 1890. Navy has won the last 13.

Inside Lejeune Hall is the Athletic Hall of Fame.  These are two former midshipmen you may know.

Inside Lejeune Hall is the Athletic Hall of Fame. These are two former midshipmen you may know.

A look at Bancroft Hall, the largest dormitory in the U.S., built in the French Renaissance style.

A look at Bancroft Hall, the largest dormitory in the U.S., built in the French Renaissance style.

In Dahlgren Hall, the ladies pose beneath a model of the Wright B-1 Flyer, the first naval aircraft.

In Dahlgren Hall, the ladies pose beneath a model of the Wright B-1 Flyer, the first naval aircraft.

A torpedo like the ones which inflicted so much damage on naval ships in Pearl Harbor.

A torpedo like the ones which inflicted so much damage on naval ships in Pearl Harbor.

The tour was very entertaining and educational. The highlight for me was perhaps entering into the Naval Academy Chapel (definitely, a misnomer), which sits atop the crypt of naval hero, John Paul Jones. The Chapel is a magnificent structure with many marvelous stained-glass windows.

The facade of the Naval Academy Chapel

The facade of the Naval Academy Chapel

The Naval Academy Chapel

The Naval Academy Chapel

The apse and altar

The apse and altar

A look back down the nave.  Notice the ship up above.

A look back down the nave. Notice the ship up above.

One of the stained glass windows. Michael the archangel is assisting Admiral David Farragut.

One of the stained glass windows. Michael the archangel is assisting Admiral David Farragut.

"Follow Me and I will make you fishers of men."

“Follow Me and I will make you fishers of men.”

The God and Country window

The God and Country window

The dome of the chapel

The dome of the chapel

Admiral David Farragut, most famous for the Civil War Battle of Mobile Bay in which he gave the order, "Damn the torpedoes,  Full speed ahead."

Admiral David Farragut, most famous for the Civil War Battle of Mobile Bay in which he gave the order, “Damn the torpedoes, Full speed ahead.”

The crypt containing the body of John Paul Jones

The crypt containing the body of John Paul Jones

The tomb of the famous navy fighter, John Paul Jones, who is famous for the shout, "I have not yet begun to fight!"

The tomb of the famous navy fighter, John Paul Jones, who is famous for the shout, “I have not yet begun to fight!”

Imposters!

Imposters!

Another highlight was watching Noon Formation, in which the Plebes line up and march in formation into lunch while the drum and bugle corp plays “Anchors Aweigh”. It was a wonderful morning, topped off by a good lunch at McGarvey’s downtown. Then, of course, it was back to more pool time.

Plebes gather in front of Bancroft Hall

Plebes gather in front of Bancroft Hall

These young men and women are just that - very young!

These young men and women are just that – very young!

Plebes in formation, marching to Lunch

Plebes in formation, marching to Lunch

The Submarine Memorial.  Notice the dolphins and faces in the waves.  The faces represent those lives which were lost at sea aboard submarines.

The Submarine Memorial. Notice the dolphins and faces in the waves. The faces represent those lives which were lost at sea aboard submarines.

Pretty in pink

Pretty in pink

Lunch!

Lunch!

Annapolis and Captain Roy

It's the journey of Beatitude thus far.  Markers represent where we've anchored, moored, or docked since leaving Bradenton last year.

It’s the journey of Beatitude thus far. Markers represent where we’ve anchored, moored, or docked since leaving Bradenton last year.

After our long, tiring, exhausting, inspiring, amazing, delightful day on Friday in the nation’s capital, we needed Saturday to recuperate. We didn’t leave the marina. We hung out on Beatitude and hung out at the marina pool. What a lovely day! The capstone on our fabulous day was a visit by Captain Roy Rogers. Captain Roy taught Cindy and I all about sailing and living aboard a sailboat over six days in Tampa Bay in February of 2012. He has subsequently relocated to the D.C. area with his lovely wife, Cathy. He happened to be in Annapolis on Saturday renewing his Coast Guard Captain’s License. After he aced the exam, he joined us aboard our home for a rum runner and some relaxation. It was so good to sit down and chat with him once again. In the evening, I grilled some tender, delectable filet mignon along with some succulent grilled corn. Cindy made a wonderful salad to complement our main course. ¡Delicioso! Afterwards, Cindy, Christy, and I enjoyed playing cards until bed time.

Christy chillin' on the foredeck.

Christy chillin’ on the foredeck.

On Sunday, we attended St. Anne’s Parish Church in Annapolis. Last week, Cindy attended by herself since I was in Maine. This week, we were all blessed to attend. It was such a wonderful worship service. From the choir to the hymns, to the sermon, to the Eucharist, we were blessed. Although, Cindy posted a few photos from her visit, I have a few more here. We had some perfectly cooked New York style pizza for lunch at Roccos Pizzeria, not far from the marina. Then, for dinner, we were thrilled to meet with Captain Roy and his wife, Cathy, at the Chart House in Annapolis. We initially rendezvoused at Beatitude, since Cathy had not yet seen our home on the water. We chatted for a while over a glass of Sauvignon Blanc before heading to Chart House for another delicious meal. Roy and Cathy are both wonderful people who’ve come into our lives all because of our sailing adventures. The great people we meet are an added bonus to our adventurous lifestyle.

Ready for church.

Ready for church.

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Walking up Main Street to St. Anne's, the "Church in the Circle"

Walking up Main Street to St. Anne’s, the “Church in the Circle”

St. Anne's interior

St. Anne’s interior

The beautifully carved altarpiece

The beautifully carved altarpiece

Looking back at the organ

Looking back at the organ

Francis Scott Key used to attend!

Francis Scott Key used to attend!

St. Anne's Steeple (with town clock)

St. Anne’s Steeple (with town clock)

The Churchyard of St. Anne's houses some very old graves.  This guy lived from 1669-1699.  Perhaps, about the life expectancy?

The Churchyard of St. Anne’s houses some very old graves. This guy lived from 1669-1699. Perhaps, about the life expectancy?

The living among the dead in the church yard of St. Anne's

The living among the dead in the church yard of St. Anne’s

A look from St. Anne's Parish Church toward the triangular Maryland Hotel.

A look from St. Anne’s Parish Church toward the triangular Maryland Hotel.

Looking down Main Street

Looking down Main Street

Cathy, Roy, Cindy, Barry in Beatitude's Salon

Cathy, Roy, Cindy, Barry in Beatitude’s Salon

The ladies ready for dinner at the Chart House

The ladies ready for dinner at the Chart House

Cindy's fantastically presented Coconut Shrimp.  It looks like a sea fan/coral behind.

Cindy’s fantastically presented Coconut Shrimp. It looks like a sea fan/coral behind.