Sunday in Norfolk

Who'd have guessed I'd see the Staten Island Ferry being towed up the Elizabeth River?

Who’d have guessed I’d see the Staten Island Ferry being towed up the Elizabeth River?

Sunday was our last day in Norfolk. It was a very good day which began with worship at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church located approximately a half-mile from Waterside Marina. St. Paul’s, like so many of the churches we’ve been blessed to visit on our trek up the east coast, has a very significant history. The first church was built on the site in 1640. When a larger church was needed in 1739, the Borough Church, which became St. Paul’s was built. The church grounds served as the town’s only burial ground, hence most of Norfolk’s early residents were interred there. On January 1, 1776, the church was fired on by Lord Dunmore. A British cannonball is still lodged on the brick wall at the southeast corner of the church. After the bombardment and burning of Norfolk, the town was destroyed. Only the brick walls of the church stood, making the present building the only building in Norfolk still standing from Pre-Revolutionary times.

We walked past the towering spire of the Basilica of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception, the oldest Roman Catholic parish in the Diocese of Richmond (1791).  It was built in 1857.  Today it is a predominantly African-American congregation.  (Unfortunately, we didn't have time to go inside)

We walked past the towering spire of the Basilica of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception, the oldest Roman Catholic parish in the Diocese of Richmond (1791). It was built in 1857. Today it is a predominantly African-American congregation. (Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to go inside)

Lord Dunmore will never live this down!

Lord Dunmore will never live this down!

St. Paul's Episcopal

St. Paul’s Episcopal

An old grave beside the church dating to 1777.

An old grave beside the church dating to 1777.

Unfortunately, the church is undergoing renovations/repairs, so the service was held in the Parish Hall. We did go inside the church building for a couple of photos, but everything was dark, dusty, and covered in plastic wrap. However, the service itself was packed with friendly people and was most enjoyable.

The apse of the church under remodeling/repair.

The apse of the church under remodeling/repair.

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After worship, we walked a few blocks to Freemason Abbey. This building was originally built as Second Presbyterian Church in 1873. It has changed hands a few times since its inception, the last in 1988, when the planning of Freemason Abbey Restaurant and Tavern began. The interior is beautifully decorated and the food is excellent. It was only right to eat in a church the day after we ate in hell.

A gorgeous Colonial-era home.

A gorgeous Colonial-era home.

And another...

And another…

The local Baptist church.  Someone forgot to get the memo that Baptist churches are not supossed to look like this. :)

The local Baptist church. Someone forgot to get the memo that Baptist churches are not supossed to look like this. 🙂

The Moses Myers House, one of the first brick houses built in Norfolk after the Revolutionary War.

The Moses Myers House, one of the first brick houses built in Norfolk after the Revolutionary War.

The Epworth United Methodist Church

The Epworth United Methodist Church

The tower of the Epworth United Methodist Church, founded in 1850; at present site since 1896.  (Cool gargoyles)

The tower of the Epworth United Methodist Church, founded in 1850; at present site since 1896. (Cool gargoyles)

Freemason Abbey Restaurant

Freemason Abbey Restaurant

Freemason Abbey Interior

Freemason Abbey Interior

Freemason Abbey Interior

Freemason Abbey Interior

Cobblestone Street in the West Freemason Street Area Historic District.

Cobblestone Street in the West Freemason Street Area Historic District.

After a delicious lunch, we walked a few more blocks to the Chrysler Museum of Art. In 1971, the automotive heir, Walter P. Chrysler, Jr (whose wife was a Norfolk native) donated most of his extensive collection to the museum. It is now one of the major art museums in the Southeastern United States. It houses quite a collection of ancient art, glass (including many works by Tiffany), and European and American paintings and sculpture from the Middle Ages to the present day. What a wonderful way to spend an afternoon! (I apologize for the numerous artworks which follow. Sort of. It was hard to whittle it down to just these few.)

Art!!

Art!!

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Glass Dress

Glass Dress

Tiffany stained glass

Tiffany stained glass

Magnificent Glass Vase

Magnificent Glass Vase

St. Peter (French)

St. Peter (French)

Christ as Man of Sorrows, Albert Bouts, 1452-1549

Christ as Man of Sorrows, Albert Bouts, 1452-1549

Last Judgment, German, 1490

Last Judgment, German, 1490

Christ in the House of Martha and Mary, 1600, Flemish

Christ in the House of Martha and Mary, 1600, Flemish

The Martyrdom of Saint Justina, 1635, Bernardo Strozzi.  While suffering martyrdom, her gaze is positioned heavenward, where an angel hovers with a martyr's palm and crown.

The Martyrdom of Saint Justina, 1635, Bernardo Strozzi. While suffering martyrdom, her gaze is positioned heavenward, where an angel hovers with a martyr’s palm and crown.

Madonna and Child, after 1625, Alessandro Turchi

Madonna and Child, after 1625, Alessandro Turchi

The Card Players, 1675, Giovanni Battista Boncori.  A morality lesson.  This young man leans forward thinking he is winning at cards, while his pocket is picked.

The Card Players, 1675, Giovanni Battista Boncori. A morality lesson. This young man leans forward thinking he is winning at cards, while his pocket is picked.

Peter Paul Rubens, 1616, The Archduchess Isabella Clara Eugenia

Peter Paul Rubens, 1616, The Archduchess Isabella Clara Eugenia

Detail from a painting depicting quackery in medicine.  The barber performs back surgery while the patient screams in pain.  The monkey reinforces the foolishness of the happenings.

Detail from a painting depicting quackery in medicine. The barber performs back surgery while the patient screams in pain. The monkey reinforces the foolishness of the happenings.

The Apotheosis of George Washington.

The Apotheosis of George Washington.

Proserpine, Hiram Powers, Marbe, 1844

Proserpine, Hiram Powers, Marbe, 1844

Minnehaha Falls, Albert Bierstadt, Great American Landscape Artist, 1800s

Minnehaha Falls, Albert Bierstadt, Great American Landscape Artist, 1800s

Dem Was Good Ole Times, Thomas Hovenden, American, 1882

Dem Was Good Ole Times, Thomas Hovenden, American, 1882

The Neophyte (First Experience of the Monastery), Gustave Doré, 1866-68

The Neophyte (First Experience of the Monastery), Gustave Doré, 1866-68

Poor young woman with child

Poor young woman with child

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This artist is amazing!

This artist is amazing!

The First Funeral (Adam and Eve with Abel)

The First Funeral (Adam and Eve with Abel)

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Mark Rothko, No. 5, 1949, "The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them."

Mark Rothko, No. 5, 1949, “The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them.”

Sunday evening was spent doing some laundry and preparing for the next leg of our trip: A planned three-day sail up the Chesapeake to Annapolis. There I will leave Cindy aboard Beatitude for several days while I fly up to Maine to work. We hope to have a nice, relaxing three days journey on the open waters of the Chesapeake. We’ve motored for, it seems like forever, while making our way up the ICW. We’ll now have an opportunity to raise the sails for a few days. We, of course, hope to find a cozy place to anchor each night.

The 3 Christian Virtues: Faith, Love, and Hope

The 3 Christian Virtues: Faith, Love, and Hope

6 thoughts on “Sunday in Norfolk

  1. Barry and Cindy,
    I so love to visit your blog and I really have enjoyed your trip up the East Coast, NC and VA. I went to college in Norfolk, and spent a lot of time enjoying the sites that you have visited. I have also sailed the Chesapeake Bay and there are lots of wonderful cozy places to anchor!!. Continue to be safe, enjoy your journey with your sails flying. I look forward to traveling with you from my chair! God Bless, Katherine

    • Thans, Katherine! That’s cool that you spent time in Norfolk. It seems like a really nice place to spend some time. Thanks for traveling with us! 🙂

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