Annapolis to Chesapeake City

Beatitude did not splash into the water until late Monday evening, so a Tuesday morning departure was out of the question. So, in the evening, we took Dalí into downtown Annapolis for dinner at a nice restaurant called The Federal. Tuesday was spent cleaning and washing our vessel, as well as provisioning for the next couple of weeks. We also had a pleasant afternoon visit by Captain Roy.

Beatitude back in the water and ready to proceed northward.

Beatitude back in the water and ready to proceed northward.

Heading into Annapolis for dinner at The Federal Bar.  Good food!

Heading into Annapolis for dinner at The Federal Bar. Good food!

Selfie at dinner in Annapolis

Selfie at dinner in Annapolis

The dinghy ride home from The Federal

The dinghy ride home from The Federal

Bath time for Beatitude

Bath time for Beatitude

Hard at work cleaning our home

Hard at work cleaning our home

Showing our new electronics to Captain Roy

Showing our new electronics to Captain Roy

Observing the process of putting Beatitude back in the lift for transport to the water.

Observing the process of putting Beatitude back in the lift for transport to the water.

On her way.

On her way.

The lift hauls our home toward the water.

The lift hauls our home toward the water.

Beatitude on her way to the water (Cindy waving on left).

Beatitude on her way to the water (Cindy waving on left).

Beatitude on the slings being lowered into the water.

Beatitude on the slings being lowered into the water.

Gull observing the splashing of Beatitude

Gull observing the splashing of Beatitude

Wednesday morning however, we were up early and pulled away from the docks at Port Annapolis Marina by 7:30 a.m. Our plan was to motor next door to Annapolis Landing Marina and fill up with fuel before heading up the Chesapeake. Unfortunately, on the short jump from marina to marina, we noticed that there was no raw water coming from the starboard engine exhaust. This was not the way we had hoped to resume our cruising. I pulled into the fuel dock and filled both tanks ($2.39/gallon for diesel!). The folks at Annapolis Landing Marina were so accommodating! They let me pull over to one of their side docks to investigate and correct the problem. The problem turned out to be the impeller. It had begun to disintegrate into little pieces. It, of course, took me much longer to remove and replace it than it should have. But, after a little while, and with some assistance from the Port Annapolis guys, the job was complete and we were on our way, although we were over two hours behind schedule.

Cindy preparing some crock-pot ribs!

Cindy preparing some crock-pot ribs!

I'm not sure what I find so funny here.  Maybe the fact that $300+ dollars are going into the fuel tank!  Maybe it's a little joy before the pain of impeller issues.

I’m not sure what I find so funny here. Maybe the fact that $300+ dollars are going into the fuel tank! Maybe it’s a little joy before the pain of impeller issues.

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Your impeller should not look like this (of course, I took out a few chunks in removing it).

Your impeller should not look like this (of course, I took out a few chunks in removing it).

We journeyed in a mostly north-northeastwardly direction up the rest of the Chesapeake Bay for the next eight hours, covering a total of just over fifty nautical miles. The wind was directly from behind making for almost zero apparent wind. This in turn made for a hot and sticky ride for the first few hours. The sea state was tolerable, though, with one-foot waves from astern. As we made our way into the northern Chesapeake, the seas flattened and our transit was calm and smooth. Then, around 3:30, we encountered a little afternoon squall and rain storm. Believe it or not, the last time we encountered any squally/rainy weather while underway was way back in October, 2014 as we were approaching Key West from Marco Island. We’ve been blessed with great travel weather for the most part. I donned rain gear for about an hour. Then, as quickly as the storms came, they departed. But, left behind was a pleasant cool evening. The northern Chesapeake was quite beautiful. The scenery was different than anything we’ve experienced thus far. Farm houses and red barns were interspersed among clumps of trees and pleasant green meadows on hillsides which graced the shores of the bay.

Approaching the Chesapeake Bay Bridge just north of Annapolis, 186 ft.  vertical clearance.  This was one we didn't need to sweat.

Approaching the Chesapeake Bay Bridge just north of Annapolis, 186 ft. vertical clearance. This was one we didn’t need to sweat.

Passing another sailboat heading north on the Chesapeake.  That's a prime perch on the bow.

Passing another sailboat heading north on the Chesapeake. That’s a prime perch on the bow.

Our squall approaches from astern.

Our squall approaches from astern.

All comfy in my rain gear (while Cindy enjoys the dry environment of the salon). :)

All comfy in my rain gear (while Cindy enjoys the dry environment of the salon). 🙂

Storm on the Chesapeake

Storm on the Chesapeake

Beatiful lighthouse on the northern Chesapeake Bay

Beatiful lighthouse on the northern Chesapeake Bay

Not the scenery we're used to.

Not the scenery we’re used to.

Motoring through the peaceful calm waters of the northern Chesapeake

Motoring through the peaceful calm waters of the northern Chesapeake

One of two majestic bald eagles  we encountered along the water's edge

One of two majestic bald eagles we encountered along the water’s edge

Approaching the 140 ft. vertical clearance Chesapeake City Bridge.  Cindy preparing to anchor.

Approaching the 140 ft. vertical clearance Chesapeake City Bridge. Cindy preparing to anchor.

Around 5:40 in the afternoon, we cleared the Chesapeake City Bridge and entered into the Chesapeake City anchorage. There were three other vessels anchored, but there was room for a couple of more. Unfortunately, we could not get our anchor to set to my satisfaction. Three separate attempts in three separate locations were unsuccessful. The thick, soft mud, would not hold. I always back down on the anchor with both engines at 2000 r.p.m. If we do not move, I feel comfortable that we’ll be secure for the night. But, we just couldn’t get the anchor to set in the Chesapeake City anchorage. This is only the second time we were unable to get our anchor to hold in our last year of cruising. I called the marina and asked if they had a slip. They didn’t, but told me there was a free town dock next door that had room for us. Wow! What a blessing! We motored over and tied up to the town dock, assisted by a couple of locals who helped in tying up our lines. We docked just in front of Miss Clare, a diminutive tour boat run by the sweetest couple. They’ve been married for 50 years and have been running this small boat tour company for the last 25 years. His is the fifth consecutive generation on the water. He showed us wonderful photographs from the 1860s of his great-great-great-grandfather and his wife, as well as the Civil War Steamship which he commanded.

Our home at the free docks.  To the left is the anchorage that we gave up on after three unsuccessful attempts.

Our home at the free docks. To the left is the anchorage that we gave up on after three unsuccessful attempts.

Did I mention "free"?

Did I mention “free”?

Tied to the free town docks.

Tied to the free town docks.

Beatitude is visible on the town docks beneath the arched Chesapeake City Bridge

Beatitude is visible on the town docks beneath the arched Chesapeake City Bridge

After securing our vessel, we enjoyed some “fall-off-the-bone” pork spare ribs which had cooked on low in the crockpot all day. We’ve had the crockpot for a while, but this was the first time we used it. We were concerned with power consumption, but it occurred to Cindy that while underway with the engines running, we needn’t worry about our power supply. So, this, I am sure, was the first of many crockpot meals.

The final, delicious product.   Well earned after our anchoring issues.

The final, delicious product. Well earned after our anchoring issues.

After enjoying a peaceful night on the town dock, we walked around the wonderfully quaint town of Chesapeake City for a couple of hours. Chesapeake City owes its existence to the construction of the C & D Canal, a 14-mile long, 450-foot wide and 35-deep canal connecting the northern Chesapeake Bay with the northern Delaware Bay. The canal replaced a 300-mile ocean trip with a calm, 14-mile journey. The influx of passengers and ships gave birth to a bustling community called Bohemia Village. Over time, the waterfront town changed its name to Chesapeake City. It’s main street is lined with some of the most charming and attractive stores and restaurants you could wish for. The people are very friendly. And, best of all for us, we have free dockage on the brand new town docks.

Flowers in town.

Flowers in town.

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Shopping in one of the quaint stores.

Shopping in one of the quaint stores.

Beautiful Chesapeake City

Beautiful Chesapeake City

A cute store now occupies what once was a bank in town.  They even used the vault as one of the rooms in the shop.

A cute store now occupies what once was a bank in town. They even used the vault as one of the rooms in the shop.

A huge ship making it's way down the canal, past the city, and under the bridge.  I think it needed most of the 140 foot vertical clearance to get through.

A huge ship making it’s way down the canal, past the city, and under the bridge. I think it needed most of the 140 foot vertical clearance to get through.

There is a 24-hour time limit to stay at the dock, but I gave the dock master a call and he graciously agreed to let us stay an additional 24 hours. This was very fortuitous for us, since today would not have been a pleasant day to make our way down the Delaware to Cape May, NJ. Winds were coming up the bay all day at 15-25 miles/hour with rain and squalls. Waves, which we would have been bashing into, were forecast to be 3-4 feet. Tomorrow’s winds are supposed to be out of the NW with smaller waves which should make for a much better day’s passage. So, we decided to stay in this lovely place called Chesapeake City, MD. This afternoon, we’ve had fairly steady rain for the past three hours. But, even that has been enjoyable. We’ll have dinner tonight at the Chesapeake Inn and plan to arise with the sun tomorrow morning, hoping to cover a lot of miles in one day.

The Chesapeake Inn behind our vessel at night.

The Chesapeake Inn behind our vessel at night.

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