Blessings of Family Visits

We were blessed with the visit of Cindy’s brother, Donnie, and his wife, Judy, for several days this week. We love having family visit us on Beatitude! This makes four family visits in a little over a month or so — first, Christy visited us in Annapolis, Second,Julie and Tracy in NYC; third, Ben and Kristie in Nantucket; and finally, Donnie and Judy in Annapolis. We’ve had such a good time with them all.

The most exciting time of day.... getting on and off the boat.

The most exciting time of day…. getting on and off the boat.

Donnie and Judy arrived after dark on Monday evening after their “5-hour” trip from Barberton, Ohio. It didn’t take long to begin our game-playing (consisting primarily of the card game, “golf”). The men dominated the game-playing winning all games, but the last two, both of which were a “talking game” (“Taboo,” and not that I’m implying anything by that).

Playing games in the cockpit.

Playing games in the cockpit.

On Tuesday, we drove over to town and walked some of the streets of Annapolis, stopping for photos at old homes off Duke of Gloucester Street (I love the street names in Annapolis) and shopping our way down Main Street (okay, not so great a street name). That evening, I paid a debt at the Chart House Restaurant. The Cleveland Cavaliers defeated the Atlanta Hawks in the NBA Eastern Conference Championships this past season, hence, the dinner I owed to Donnie. I could think of worse punishment than a great dinner at Chart House with great people.

The Zimmerman House (1893), a rare example of Queen Anne architecture.  This was built for Charles Zimmerman, leader of the US Naval Academy band and composer of "Anchors Aweigh."

The Zimmerman House (1893), a rare example of Queen Anne architecture. This was built for Charles Zimmerman, leader of the US Naval Academy band and composer of “Anchors Aweigh.”

The Jonas Green house.  Built in the 1740s, it was the home of Jonas Green, printer of the Maryland Gazette.  It was also his print shop until 1786 and is still owned by his descendants.

The Jonas Green house. Built in the 1740s, it was the home of Jonas Green, printer of the Maryland Gazette. It was also his print shop until 1786 and is still owned by his descendants.

The old postman at the old postmaster's office. :)

The old postman at the old postmaster’s office. 🙂

Now... tell me what you really think!!  (seen on Main Street, Annapolis)

Now… tell me what you really think!! (seen on Main Street, Annapolis)

Twins!

Twins!

The men waiting on the women.

The men waiting on the women.

At the Chart House pier

At the Chart House pier

Our guests on the Chart House pier.

Our guests on the Chart House pier.

Wednesday was a wonderful day! Mid-morning, we slipped from our dock and took Beatitude out for a sail, what Judy called a “three-hour tour.” Our guests enjoyed being out on the water, under sail, on our beautiful home. Winds were from the NE at 10-15 knots, providing for a leisurely 5-knot sail on a beam reach. It was rather nice to be out sailing, just for the fun of it with no destination in mind and no definite number of miles needed to cover. Among other things, it gave me the opportunity to experiment with sail trim. After a pleasant couple of hours under the bright, late-summer sun, we returned Beatitude to her slip, passing the afternoon in conversation and playing games in the cockpit. For dinner, we ate great food in an establishment with a marvelous ambience: Reynolds Tavern, the oldest Tavern in Annapolis and one of the oldest in the United States. After enjoying our meal in an 18th-century dining room, we walked through some of the rest of the building. Downstairs is the 1747 Pub, which was the original kitchen and “Hat Shop” of William Reynolds. The pub has stone and brick walls, a walk-in fireplace, low ceilings, brick floors, and the original stairwell from the 1737 construction.

Enjoying our "Three-hour Tour"

Enjoying our “Three-hour Tour”

Basking in the sunshine on the port bow.

Basking in the sunshine on the port bow.

A glorious afternoon on the water.

A glorious afternoon on the water.

IMG_1860

Relaxing day under sail.

Relaxing day under sail.

This deer (and four or five others) was on the marina property as we were leaving for dinner.

This deer (and four or five others) was on the marina property as we were leaving for dinner.

The Reynolds Tavern

The Reynolds Tavern

Dinner at Reynolds Tavern with wonderful period furnishings

Dinner at Reynolds Tavern with wonderful period furnishings

Part of the 18th-century dining area

Part of the 18th-century dining area

Dining Room

Dining Room

Dinner at the Reynolds Tavern with Washington and Jefferson watching over us.

Dinner at the Reynolds Tavern with Washington and Jefferson watching over us.

Cindy and Judy in the 1747 Pub

Cindy and Judy in the 1747 Pub

The 278-year-old walls of the 1747 pub.

The 278-year-old walls of the 1747 pub.

The wisdom of Mr. Franklin, as written on the walls of the 1747 Pub

The wisdom of Mr. Franklin, as written on the walls of the 1747 Pub

Unfortunately, the time of our visit with Donnie and Judy was woefully short. Thursday morning, we said our good-byes as they made their return trip to Ohio. Cindy and I will spend the next day or two preparing for our trip to Maine. On Saturday, I return to Portland, Maine to work for a week and a half. Thankfully, this time, my wife will accompany me.

Judy and Donnie ready for burgers.

Judy and Donnie ready for burgers.

The bow-shot!

The bow-shot!

A Landlubber’s Weekend

Friday morning we woke up early (for us) to drive the hour and fifteen minutes to the north side of Baltimore. Why? To meet up with old friends whom we last saw at least fifteen years ago. Mark and Roxanne were not only members of a church I pastored in Berwick, but they have been wonderful friends to us. Mark and I enjoyed many conversations of a spiritual and/or theological nature in the past, intermingled with some great tennis matches. It was so good to see them again. We were able to spend about 3 1/2 hours over breakfast at Bob Evans recollecting and reconnecting.

Careys and O'Reillys

Careys and O’Reillys

Since we were already on the other side of Baltimore, we decided to make a full day of it. Our first stop was the Baltimore Museum of Art. It was there that 15-20 years ago, I was introduced to what has since become a passion with me, the world of fine art. Our first visit to this museum was for a special Paul Cezanne exhibition. Since then, Cindy and I have been graced to visit some of the greatest museums of the world.

The front steps of the Baltimore Museum of Art

The front steps of the Baltimore Museum of Art

Jackson Pollack

Jackson Pollack

The BMoA has a wonderful collection of ancient Antiochian Mosaics, this one with a nautical theme.

The BMoA has a wonderful collection of ancient Antiochian Mosaics, this one with a nautical theme.

A work by the French traditionalist, William-Adolphe Bouguereau

A work by the French traditionalist, William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Can you guess this artist? (Picasso)

Can you guess this artist? (Picasso)

And this one?  (Van Gogh)

And this one? (Van Gogh)

After spending an hour or two at the Baltimore Museum of Art, we drove downtown to the Walters Art Museum, hosting a wonderful collection amassed by a father and son during the mid-19th century, William T. and Henry Walters. The museum, in my estimation, is every bit as good, if not more so, than the Baltimore Museum of Art. We were pleasantly surprised to view excellent works from ancient times through the 19th century.

This young lady is restoring/conserving a 15th-century Quran from India.  Pretty awesome.

This young lady is restoring/conserving a 15th-century Quran from India. Pretty awesome.

Manet

Manet

Delacroix - Christ and his Disciples on the Sea of Galilee

Delacroix – Christ and his Disciples on the Sea of Galilee

Cindy before a large altarpiece

Cindy before a large altarpiece

A large 13th century Italian Crucifix (Florence)

A large 13th century Italian Crucifix (Florence)

The Madonna of the Candelabra, 1513 (Raphael and his workshop)

The Madonna of the Candelabra, 1513 (Raphael and his workshop)

An unusual "Penitent Magdalen"

An unusual “Penitent Magdalen”

Inside the Walters Art Museum

Inside the Walters Art Museum

After dinner at the Cheesecake Factory on Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, we drove to the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall to enjoy an evening with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The highlight of the evening was Olga Kern’s performance of Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. What a beautiful piece performed so well by Ms. Kern and the orchestra! And, what a powerful emotional release with the revelation of that 18th variation!

Cool Methodist Church, 1843, a block from the Walters.  A plaque on the church mentions that Francis Scott Key died on this site.

Cool Methodist Church, 1843, a block from the Walters. A plaque on the church mentions that Francis Scott Key died on this site.

The Baltimore Inner Harbor.  We debated on bringing Beatitude up into the Inner Harbor, but visited by car instead.

The Baltimore Inner Harbor. We debated on bringing Beatitude up into the Inner Harbor, but visited by car instead.

The U.S.S. Constellation, 1854, the last sail-only warship designed and built by the Navy.  She took part in the African Slave Trade Patrol, disrupting the Atlantic Slave Trade.

The U.S.S. Constellation, 1854, the last sail-only warship designed and built by the Navy. She took part in the African Slave Trade Patrol, disrupting the Atlantic Slave Trade.

In our box at the Baltimore Symphony

In our box at the Baltimore Symphony

Ready for a little Rachmaninoff

Ready for a little Rachmaninoff

The virtuosic Olga Kern

The virtuosic Olga Kern

On Saturday, Cindy and I spent two or three hours painting with Acrylics in Beatitude’s cockpit. Viewing all that wonderful art inspires us to explore our own creative sides. We finished up in time to drive to the local Buffalo Wild Wings to sit in front of the big screen to watch Georgia’s annihilation of the South Carolina Gamecocks, 52-20. In so doing, Georgia’s beleaguered transfer quarterback, Greyson Lambert, broke the all-time college football record for completion percentage in a game, completing 24 of 25 passes. Wow!

Untitled - Cynthia Carey

Untitled – Cynthia Carey

Sunday, Cindy and I attended worship at St. Anne’s Church in Annapolis. We’ve attended here previously, and always leave encouraged and challenged. The music, liturgy, and message were all well done and edifying. After lunch, some shopping, and a haircut, we returned to Beatitude for the rest of the evening. Today, we will receive another special visit by family. Donnie and Judy are coming to spend three of four days with us!

Cindy waiting for laundry to finish

Cindy waiting for laundry to finish

Laundry time at the marina

Laundry time at the marina

Sunset from aboard Beatitude

Sunset from aboard Beatitude

Return to Annapolis

When we arrived in Chesapeake City, MD on Saturday afternoon, we felt surprisingly well. The relatively benign conditions of the previous night had allowed our minds and bodies to recuperate from the taxing conditions of the day before. We were thrilled to find a space open on the free dock where we could tie up. The rest of the day was a day to rest. Cindy and I walked next-door to the Chesapeake Inn around 3 p.m. to have lunner and watch the Georgia/Vanderbilt football game, which, thankfully, had a happy outcome for Georgia fans.

Stepping onto the Chesapeake City town dock.

Stepping onto the Chesapeake City town dock.

The Chesapeake City anchorage.

The Chesapeake City anchorage.

We could have hung around for another night or two, but with the whirlwind of movement and activity over the last four weeks, we were anxious to settle in to a place for a few weeks. So, early Sunday morning, we set out for Annapolis. We left Chesapeake City at low tide, which meant the normally shallow water by the city dock was at its shallowest. Our hulls had gently settled in the soft mud. I had to give the engines a little more throttle in order to plow ourselves through the oozy bottom and away from the dock. Soon, we had passed beneath the Chesapeake City bridge and were making our way down the Chesapeake Bay. This day’s journey was benign and unexciting (which was just fine with us!).

Our spot on the town dock, recently vacated by our yacht.

Our spot on the town dock, recently vacated by our yacht.

Leaving the Chesapeake City Bridge in our wake.

Leaving the Chesapeake City Bridge in our wake.

Beautiful Bald Eagle on the C&D Canal ( a little out of focus due to its distance from us and our moving frame of reference)

Beautiful Bald Eagle on the C&D Canal ( a little out of focus due to its distance from us and our moving frame of reference)

One of the many tankers we've contended with over the past couple of days.  This one heading down the Chesapeake.

One of the many tankers we’ve contended with over the past couple of days. This one heading down the Chesapeake.

We stopped for fuel again before pulling into our old slip at Port Annapolis Marina. It was so nice to pay $2.34/gallon for diesel rather than the $5.00/gallon we paid in Nantucket. While we enjoyed our month-long excursion to New England, I’m not sure we could spend a lot of time there. Everything marine is so expensive, whether it be fuel, or moorings, or marinas.

Bundled up for a cool morning at the helm station.

Bundled up for a cool morning at the helm station.

Burgers for lunch while underway.

Burgers for lunch while underway.

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge as we near Annapolis.

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge as we near Annapolis.

Dusty, our friend and Beatitude follower, at the Annapolis Landing Marina fuel dock.  A great guy!

Dusty, our friend and Beatitude follower, at the Annapolis Landing Marina fuel dock. A great guy!

Since we’ve returned to Annapolis on Sunday, we’ve spent some time reprovisioning and organizing. We’ve also worked on a few minor repairs and boat projects on our to-do list. Last evening, we were excited to have Keith and Sarah spend a few hours visiting aboard beatitude. Keith is also an emergency physician, who lives on a sailboat and does locums work. His boat spends most of the time in the Bahamas. He was very helpful to me when I was looking into doing the same, and, in fact, referred me to the company for which I have been working. We’ve been looking to hook up in person for some time, and although we’ve been with a few miles of each other on several occasions, we finally made face-to-face contact. He and Sarah, his Canadian/Bahamian girlfriend, are here in Annapolis on their sailboat at this time. It was a joy to spend time with these wonderful, down-to-earth people last evening, sharing stories and plans. They’ll likely be heading southward before us, so we’ll have to catch up with them again down the road.

Provisions in the trunk of our rental car.  Lot's more in the backseat.

Provisions in the trunk of our rental car. Lot’s more in the backseat.

Beatitude back in her slip on E-dock at Port Annapolis Marina.

Beatitude back in her slip on E-dock at Port Annapolis Marina.

"Shocking" the fresh water system on Beatitude with chlorine.  The port side does not get used as often and the water can get pretty stagnant in the lines.

“Shocking” the fresh water system on Beatitude with chlorine. The port side does not get used as often and the water can get pretty stagnant in the lines.

Fixing the leak in the water maker.  Success! (I think)

Fixing the leak in the water maker. Success! (I think)

A wonderful dinner at Jalapeño's.  What great Mexican/Spanish food!

A wonderful dinner at Jalapeño’s. What great Mexican/Spanish food!

Keith and Sarah relaxing on Beatitude's foredeck on a very pleasant evening.

Keith and Sarah relaxing on Beatitude’s foredeck on a very pleasant evening.

The bow shot!

The bow shot!

Our plans for the next month look like this: We’ll hang out on board for the next week and a half. During that time — We are so excited! — Cindy’s brother, Donnie, and his wife, Judy, are coming to visit us for three or four days. We’ve been extremely blessed with visits from family over the last month. Then, later in the month, I’m flying to Portland, Maine for another eight days of work. I’m thrilled Cindy has chosen to accompany me to Maine this time. Hopefully, there will be some brilliant fall colors for us to enjoy while there. We will return to Annapolis the day before the Annapolis Sailboat Show begins. We’ll likely hang around and attend the boat show for a couple of days before beginning our own trek south.

Sunset in Annapolis

Sunset in Annapolis

Beauty in the foreground dwarfing the beauty behind.

Beauty in the foreground dwarfing the beauty behind.