Gilligan’s Island

Yesterday, we visited, believe it or not, Gilligan’s Island! No, not the one from the TV show. That island was a fake one located in a TV studio. In fact, the “lagoon” was drained during the off-season for a parking lot. But, the isle we visited is a “real” Gilligan’s Island. At least, it’s called that by the locals. It’s real name is either Caña Gorda or Cayo Aurora (names change around here). “Cayo Aurora” comes from the name of a woman (Aurora) who escaped from misery and mistreatment on a nearby farm at age 40. She swam to the island and set up a Robinson Crusoe type existence for many years. Later, locals who used the island for pig roasts began calling it Gilligan’s Island after the TV show. It looked like the one on TV, and one of the fisherman resembled Bob Denver, who played Gilligan.

Beatitude at anchor off Gilligan's Island

Beatitude at anchor off Gilligan’s Island

It's nice to see lots of Pelicans again.  There weren't too many in the Bahamas.

It’s nice to see lots of Pelicans again. There weren’t too many in the Bahamas.

Gilligan's Island Lagoon from the dock where we tied up.

Gilligan’s Island Lagoon from the dock where we tied up.

So, mid-morning, we raised our anchor and travelled the 3.8 nautical miles from Guánica Harbor to the well-protected anchorage between Gilligan’s island and the mainland. After a quick lunch, we took Dalí over to the island. Seeing how it was Saturday, the island was quite busy with Puerto Rican families. A boat ran back and forth from the mainland shuttling beach-goers to and fro. The water was beautifully clear, especially for Puerto Rico. And, the lagoon did have that Gilligan’s Island feel. We enjoyed playing in the water for awhile and then returned to Beatitude.

Leaving our anchorage behind.

Leaving our anchorage behind.

Looking out through the entrance to Guánica Harbor.

Looking out through the entrance to Guánica Harbor.

Cindy, enjoying the lagoon

Cindy, enjoying the lagoon

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Before getting too settled, I hopped back in the dinghy while Cindy pulled me around Beatitude with the painter (the line attached to the front of the dinghy) so that I could wash the tannin mustache off our hulls. It was still there from our journey back down the U.S. east coast.

Using "On and Off" to clean the hulls from the tannin stains of the southeastern United States

Using “On and Off” to clean the hulls from the tannin stains of the southeastern United States

Before (right) and after (left).  I'm hoping my labels are superfluous.

Before (right) and after (left). I’m hoping my labels are superfluous.

Taking a dip after cleaning the hulls.

Taking a dip after cleaning the hulls.

This morning we motored out from behind Gilligan’s Island and out through the reef shortly after 6 a.m. It was a quick pleasant passage of seventeen nautical miles to the east in ocean swells of mostly 2-3 feet. Shortly after 9, we tied our lines to our T-head at Ponce Yacht and Fishing Club. We’ll spend a few days in Ponce, tied to the dock. It’s actually cheaper to stay here a full week than to pay for three days, so we’ll not be in too big of a rush to leave. We’ll do some exploring and deal with a few boat issues, if possible.

Sunrise on our passage to Ponce

Sunrise on our passage to Ponce

Bahia de Ponce

Bahia de Ponce

Lines prepared and fenders ready to dock at the Ponce Yacht and Fishing Club

Lines prepared and fenders ready to dock at the Ponce Yacht and Fishing Club

6 thoughts on “Gilligan’s Island

  1. That is so cool -Gilligan’sIsland. I really like how you give us a little history & tell us about the places you are at! Very interesting & informative thanks for sharing !

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