To Jost Van Dyke and the “Bubbly Pool” (with video)

Mr. Pelican on Beatitude's starboard bow pulpit.

Mr. Pelican on Beatitude’s starboard bow pulpit.

In spite of Julie’s insistence that she could stay at Marina Cay forever, we could not, and so continued our whirlwind tour of the British Virgin Islands. We released our mooring lines in the mid-morning and made our way through the Camanoe Passage toward Guana Island. The first leg of our planned itinerary was short, just a couple of miles. We soon neared the southern tip of Guana Island, which is known as Monkey Point. The point is said to have excellent snorkeling, so we arrived hopeful that the northern swell would be kind and the conditions would be benign enough to snorkel. Alas, it was not to be. There was too much swell creating rough conditions so we continued up the west coast of Guana Island to White Bay and attempted to drop our anchor. There were mooring balls available, but we didn’t think we would stay the night here, so we didn’t want to pick one up. We dropped our anchor over sand in about 13 feet of water, but we could not get it to bite. I had read that the holding in this bay was not good. The bottom was sandy, but just beneath the thin layer of sand was a hard bottom. We were 0 for 2 for the day, but continued on in hope, traveling westward over the northern coast of Tortola to check out Brewer’s Bay. It was open to the northwest, but we hoped would be protected somewhat to the swell and the northeast wind. Upon arrival, it was clear that it was not. So, for the third time in one morning, we aborted our plans and decided to sail on over to the eastern end of Jost Van Dyke. We picked up a mooring ball at the Diamond Cay mooring field, tucked in between Jost Van Dyke and Little Jost Van Dyke. While the 20+ knot winds were still whipping through, churning up the waters, at least we were protected from the five to six foot swells we had experienced in transit.

Rounding Beef Island

Rounding Beef Island

The mooring/anchorage was really quite beautiful. We were very happy to be there. There was snorkeling off the boat, a couple of bars and restaurants in the bay, and there was a promise of a natural “bubbly pool.” After lunch, we took Dalí over to the dinghy dock, paid our mooring fee and made dinner reservations at Foxy’s Taboo Restaurant. We then walked the half-mile trail to the northern coast on which was located the “bubbly pool,” a natural jacuzzi where the crashing waves of the northern swell would send water spraying and surging into the pool creating the jacuzzi effect. It was an amazing experience — like the “jacuzzis” we had enjoyed in Culebrita on steroids. Those same large northern swells that had kept us from Turtle Point and Brewer’s Bay now provided the engine that drove a spectacular display of turquoise waters driven through a narrow passage in the cliffs sending a surge of spray and bubbles into the small pool inside. We played and frolicked like children for quite some time before returning to the boat.

Beatitude sticker in Foxy's Taboo Restaurant, Jost Van Dyke

Beatitude sticker in Foxy’s Taboo Restaurant, Jost Van Dyke

Our anchorage between Jost Van Dyke, Diamond Cay, and Little Jost Van Dyke

Our anchorage between Jost Van Dyke, Diamond Cay, and Little Jost Van Dyke

At the Bubbly Pool

At the Bubbly Pool

It's a big one!

It’s a big one!

The aftermath of the big one.

The aftermath of the big one.

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In the Pool

In the Pool

On the outside of the Bubbly Pool

On the outside of the Bubbly Pool

Bubbly Pool, Jost Van Dyke

Bubbly Pool, Jost Van Dyke

Cindy was washed off her rock on which she was perched.

Cindy was washed off her rock on which she was perched.

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Tracy, Julie, Barry enjoying the Jacuzzi

Tracy, Julie, Barry enjoying the Jacuzzi

Bubble Generator

Bubble Generator

Julie needing assistance after a large wave surged through

Julie needing assistance after a large wave surged through

Wave Action at the Bubbly Pool

Wave Action at the Bubbly Pool

Tracy and I dropped off Julie and Cindy on Beatitude, and then took the dinghy up to a small little islet called Sandy Spit. There is not much there but a mound of sand with a little vegetation in the middle. It would be cool to walk around and relax on, but the conditions were, once again, too rough. So, we came back to a beach on Little Jost Van Dyke on which we grounded Dalí while we snorkeled for a few minutes. The water was a little cloudy, but the snorkeling was not too bad. We enjoyed the scattered coral and the accompanying marine life.

Cute little snails

Cute little snails

Hummingbird we passed on the trail to the Bubbly Pool

Hummingbird we passed on the trail to the Bubbly Pool

Sandy Spit behind, as we return toward the anchorage

Sandy Spit behind, as we return toward the anchorage

School of Grunts

School of Grunts

Scrawled Tilefish

Scrawled Tilefish

Around 6 p.m., we returned to Foxy’s Taboo for a pleasant dinner, drinks, and an evening’s relaxation. Despite the 20-30 knot winds we’ve experienced over the past three days, we’re all having a great time. This was Thursday, and Tracy and Julie would be flying out on Monday, just a few days away. Yet, there was still more adventure to be had!

Barry and Cindy

Barry and Cindy

Tracy and Julie

Tracy and Julie

Dinner at Foxy's Taboo, Jost Van Dyke

Dinner at Foxy’s Taboo, Jost Van Dyke

Julie and Cindy relaxing after dinner.

Julie and Cindy relaxing after dinner.

Here is a short 2-minute video of our “Bubbly Pool” experience. 🙂

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