Grenada: Taking It Easy

Five days ago, we tied to the quay at Port Louis Marina, St. George’s, Grenada. Since then, we’ve had very little on the agenda except for doing as little as possible. We’ve done very little boat work. We did re-mark our anchor chain with colored wire ties so we know how much chain we have out. We put on the original wire ties two years ago. They lasted longer than I thought they would, but some were now missing. While the chain was out of its chain locker, I climbed down in and cleaned out the mud and gunk that had accumulated over two years time. Other than that, our boat work has mainly consisted in contacting workers to arrange for them to do some work on Beatitude.

Ready to descend into the abyss known as the chain locker

Ready to descend into the abyss known as the chain locker

Cleaning the abyss

Cleaning the abyss

Cindy displaying her handiwork.  Two fluorescent wire ties marking off the 40' mark on our anchor chain.

Cindy displaying her handiwork. Two fluorescent wire ties marking off the 40′ mark on our anchor chain.

We’ve dinghied over to Island Water World (a chandlery) and to Food Land (grocery), both in the lagoon where our marina is located. On Sunday, we dinghied over to the Carenage (a small little bay adjacent to the lagoon) for church. The mass at St. George’s Anglican Church started at 7:30 a.m., which meant we had to leave Beatitude at 6:45. The people were friendly and the service was nice. Unfortunately, the parishioners are unable to meet in the actual church building which was destroyed by Hurricane Ivan in September, 2004. Grenada is generally considered to be below the hurricane belt, but, as Ivan showed, tropical systems fail to acknowledge such limits. Ivan set the record for the most southerly major hurricane in the Atlantic basin. Its path was directly over Grenada and it destroyed a number of historic buildings, including the Roman Catholic Cathedral, the Methodist Church, the Presbyterian Church, and the Anglican Church (the Presbyterian Church and Anglican Church were damaged most severely). In August of 2014, the restoration of St. George’s was begun and is still underway. The Sunday morning service was held in the Senior School Building.

At the grocery store, waiting on the downpour to subside.

At the grocery store, waiting on the downpour to subside.

Food Land with the dinghy dock out front.  It's nice to be able to take Dalí to the grocery store.  (And they have Diet Pepsi!)

Food Land with the dinghy dock out front. It’s nice to be able to take Dalí to the grocery store. (And they have Diet Pepsi!)

Dalí tied to a post in the Carenage on Sunday morning

Dalí tied to a post in the Carenage on Sunday morning

The still-unrestored Presbyterian Church in St. George's

The still-unrestored Presbyterian Church in St. George’s

St. George's Anglican Church under repair/renovation

St. George’s Anglican Church under repair/renovation

Liturgy in the St. George's Anglican Senior School

Liturgy in the St. George’s Anglican Senior School

The bronze statue of "Christ of the Abyss" stands in the Carenage surrounding the harbor at St. George's, in commemoration of the sinking of the passenger ship, the Bianca C in 1961.

The bronze statue of “Christ of the Abyss” stands in the Carenage surrounding the harbor at St. George’s, in commemoration of the sinking of the passenger ship, the Bianca C in 1961.

The Christ of the Abyss statue in downtown St. George's, Grenada.  Returning from church.

The Christ of the Abyss statue in downtown St. George’s, Grenada. Returning from church.

Fort George above my head as we return from church aboard Dalí.

Fort George above my head as we return from church aboard Dalí.

We’ve relaxed on more than one occasion at the marina pool, an inviting little spot which is frequented by a number of cruisers. We’ve enjoyed some meals at the Victory Bar and Restaurant, directly adjacent to the pool. We’ve also enjoyed some fine meals aboard Beatitude (including Cindy’s delicious Lasagna). We’ve watched movies and played games. And, most importantly, I’ve now completely recovered from my tropical disease! And, now that Cindy has recovered from her knee replacement surgery, we are getting back into the habit of walking for exercise. We’re so thankful that she is able to walk without pain!

Standing in front of the Victory Bar and Restaurant

Standing in front of the Victory Bar and Restaurant

Enjoying the pool.

Enjoying the pool.

Cooling down in the pool.

Cooling down in the pool.

Poolside lovers

Poolside lovers

Lasagna dinner on board.  Mmmm!

Lasagna dinner on board. Mmmm!

Beautiful Grenada Scenery while out for a walk.

Beautiful Grenada Scenery while out for a walk.

It’s been raining quite frequently, but there are a few hours of sunshine most everyday. We’re enjoying our “down-time” before returning to the states at the end of this week. It’s time for a few more shifts in the emergency department to replenish our dwindling money supply and to fund the necessary repairs on Beatitude. Maybe, we’ll do a little sightseeing this week before we head back. Then again, maybe we won’t. We’re truly in “chill” mode.

Beatitude tied to the quay at Port Louis.

Beatitude tied to the quay at Port Louis.

10 thoughts on “Grenada: Taking It Easy

  1. Thankful you are finally over your virus!! You guys deserve to just “chill” for a while with all that sailing and sickness and recovery going on 🙂 Love you guys…looking forward to see you all soon!! (even though I’m going to be jealous of your tans !)

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