Back in Port Louis

Last Monday, the 18th of July, we eased back into Grenada’s Port Louis Marina for a few days before returning back to the States. We were unable to reclaim our previous spot along the quay which is supplied with the 60 hertz electrical power (American), so instead we were directed to one of the other docks with 50 hertz power (which we can’t use without a transformer). This meant we would be without electricity for the week. There was very little wind blowing, which meant we were pretty toasty on board. On three of the evenings, we ran the generator for a couple of hours so that we could turn on the air for a respite from the heat and humidity.

Sunset at Port Louis Marina

Sunset at Port Louis Marina

Moonrise at the marina

Moonrise at the marina

Beatitude in her new slip.  We are still med-moored.

Beatitude in her new slip. We are still med-moored.

We’ve performed more boat tasks and maintenance during our time in Grenada than we have at any other time. The work continued as we finally (after several months of effort) were able to complete the repairs on our Garmin electronics. We’ve been without water temperature readings (no big deal) and wind speed and direction readings (bigger deal) since we left the Bahamas. When we replaced our electronics one year ago, we opted for wireless wind instruments. Big mistake! We finally decided to pay the extra labor to run the wiring up the mast to convert to a wired system. Alas! It works!

This, my friends, is wind information on my chart plotter!  Woohoo!

This, my friends, is wind information on my chart plotter! Woohoo!

This, my friends, is a water temperature reading (and wind speed)!

This, my friends, is a water temperature reading (and wind speed)!

Our tables were returned from the woodworking shop at Grenada Marine and they look great! A few years of salt water had weathered them pretty badly. The initial plan was to restore the finish on the old tables, but that didn’t work as planned. So we, in effect, have brand new tables for a the price of a refinish. We’re very happy with the results.

The old dining table.

The old dining table.

Our new dining table.

Our new dining table.

Our new "coffee" table

Our new “coffee” table

We also pulled out our gennaker (a large, light air head sail) and practiced rigging it up for use on coming passages. Now that we have some downwind sailing in front of us, we hope to finally be able to use it. We are committed to becoming better sailors (as opposed to motor-ers) in the future.

The gennaker raised on its halyard.  The sail is enclosed in an outside tube called a snuffer to allow the sail to be deployed and taken in easily.

The gennaker raised on its halyard. The sail is enclosed in an outside tube called a snuffer to allow the sail to be deployed and taken in easily.

Raising the snuffer on the gennaker.

Raising the snuffer on the gennaker.

Otherwise, I spent a couple of days wading through piles of paperwork and red tape, applying for state medical licenses and hospital privileges for future locums work. We walked downtown to have few forms notarized and had lunch at The Nutmeg on the Carenage. We cooled down in the pool on a couple of afternoons. And, one evening, we enjoyed a potluck dinner at the marina for cruisers. Its always nice meeting and mingling with others who share a similar passion.

The Nutmeg Restaurant along the Carenage.

The Nutmeg Restaurant along the Carenage.

The restaurant is located on the second floor of an old building.  From our table we have an excellent view of the carenage and all the activity below.

The restaurant is located on the second floor of an old building. From our table we have an excellent view of the carenage and all the activity below.

Waiting on lunch at the Nutmeg

Waiting on lunch at the Nutmeg

On-the-water living in downtown St. George

On-the-water living in downtown St. George

Learning the ropes.

Learning the ropes.

Potluck time!

Potluck time!

Sitting with a group of Italian sailors (and a couple from Idaho), enjoying the good food.

Sitting with a group of Italian sailors (and a couple from Idaho), enjoying the good food.

While shopping for a few groceries at FoodLand, we witnessed several people who had won a contest go on 2-minute shopping sprees, filling their carts with free groceries!

While shopping for a few groceries at FoodLand, we witnessed several people who had won a contest go on 2-minute shopping sprees, filling their carts with free groceries!

Returning from the grocery store with our faithful wagon, one of our best buys ever.  We bought it at Sam's Club a few years ago and we use it to haul just about anything and everything just about everywhere.

Returning from the grocery store with our faithful wagon, one of our best buys ever. We bought it at Sam’s Club a few years ago and we use it to haul just about anything and everything just about everywhere.

I am now in Maine where I am working for a couple of weeks to keep the cruising kitty replenished. It needs it after the extensive work we’ve had done. Cindy is in Ohio with her family during this time. In eleven days, we’ll return to Beatitude once again.

Interesting-looking mother hen and her chicks

Interesting-looking mother hen and her chicks

Right after I almost face-planted while walking down the dock.

Right after I almost face-planted while walking down the dock.

6 thoughts on “Back in Port Louis

  1. Wow! The tables look great. Sometimes I think wire is just better than wireless on electronics, although it has its own set of problems in the salt. What’s your next move after Grenada?

    • Thanks, Justin! A few days after we get back, we plan to make the 400 mile passage to Bonaire, then to Curacao and Aruba. 🙂

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