Dushi Curacao

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Dushi is a Papamiento word meaning “sweet.” It is often used to describe the island (as in “Dushi Curacao”) We thought we’d check out more of what makes Curacao “sweet” on Wednesday. First, we hopped in our rental car and drove to the north side of the island near the airport to visit the Hato Caves, formed below sea level millions of years ago. The first inhabitants were the Arawak Indians, 1500 years ago. During Curacao’s slave days, escaped slaves would hide in the caves. Portions of the ceilings are still black from the smoke from their torches. The limestone caves have numerous stalactites and stalagmites, and also house a colony of over 300 long-nose fruit bats. Pictures were not allowed in most of the cavern (including where the bats hung over our heads), but we were allowed to take a few photos.

Cindy in the Hato Caves

Cindy in the Hato Caves

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Rock Flow in the caves

Rock Flow in the caves

The Madonna, the most cherished stalagmite formation in the caves

The Madonna, the most cherished stalagmite formation in the caves

Walking to see the cave carvings

Walking to see the cave carvings

A Petroglyph (cave carving) from the Arawak Indians a millennium and a half ago.

A Petroglyph (cave carving) from the Arawak Indians a millennium and a half ago.

Another carving.  I couldn't make out anything substantial in the carvings.  If it weren't for the "arrow signs" I might have missed the carvings. :)

Another carving. I couldn’t make out anything substantial in the carvings. If it weren’t for the “arrow signs” I might have missed the carvings. 🙂

From there we drove another 30 kilometers along the northeast coast of Curacao to the Shete Boka National Park. Shete Boka means “seven inlets.” There are hiking trails to four of the inlets which we visited. Boka Tabla is the first. Here, large waves crash into an underground cavern which is easily accessed. Unfortunately, the waves were not all that impressive on this day, but it was still a cool cavern. We then hiked a small trail to Boka Kalki before hiking another to Boka Pistol. The incoming waves at Boca Pistol were fun to watch as they rush into the small inlet which has a circular cut in the rocks at its head. When a large wave comes into this round cut, it is shot up into the air as if it comes from a pistol. Lastly, we hiked over to Boka Wandomi to see the natural bridge. The park was a very beautiful place to spend an hour or two.

Cindy on a Giant Iguana at Shete Boka

Cindy on a Giant Iguana at Shete Boka

Boka Tabla

Boka Tabla

A rocky projection near Boka Tabla

A rocky projection near Boka Tabla

On the Trail to Boka Kalki

On the Trail to Boka Kalki

Boka Kalki

Boka Kalki

On the trail back from Boka Kalki.  Mt. Christoffel (named after St. Christopher), the highest point on the island (1200 ft.) in the background.

On the trail back from Boka Kalki. Mt. Christoffel (named after St. Christopher), the highest point on the island (1200 ft.) in the background.

Boka Pistol

Boka Pistol

Boka Pistol

Boka Pistol

Cindy being creative with the rocks at Boka Pistol

Cindy being creative with the rocks at Boka Pistol

In the 1970's, in Bible College in St. Paul, Minnesota, I wrote Cindy's name in the snow on the hillside for all to see.  I can't take credit for this one.  It was already spelled out at Boka Wandomi.

In the 1970’s, in Bible College in St. Paul, Minnesota, I wrote Cindy’s name in the snow on the hillside for all to see. I can’t take credit for this one. It was already spelled out at Boka Wandomi.

The natural bridge at Boka Wandomi.

The natural bridge at Boka Wandomi.

Cindy atop the Natural Bridge

Cindy atop the Natural Bridge

He hideth my soul in the cleft of the rock.

He hideth my soul in the cleft of the rock.

Lastly, we drove the short distance to the lee side of the island for a visit to Playa Kalki, a beach on the western tip of Curaco. We were at first unimpressed and a little disappointed. I had read it was a really nice beach, but the narrow strip of sand was quite rocky and our entrance into the waters was difficult due to the rocks. However, when Cindy decided to head back in for a little work on her tan while lounging on a beach chair, I donned my mask and snorkel and enjoyed a surprisingly nice thirty to forty-five minutes of communing with the fishes. In about eight to ten feet of water, I found an abundance of various fish species in beautiful clear water. There were numerous parrotfish, angelfish, snapper, tangs, and damselfish. We ended up having a great time, but I definitely wouldn’t recommend this beach as a swimming beach.

Sunbathing on Playa Kalki

Sunbathing on Playa Kalki

Playa Kalki, a great snorkeling beach.

Playa Kalki, a great snorkeling beach.

Since the afternoon was passing quickly, we decided to head back down the island to our marina. It took well over an hour to travel the twenty-five to thirty miles. The traffic is pretty horrible on Curacao. I think there are more cars than were intended when they designed the roads. But, our day was rewarding. We have one more day to play before preparing to leave for our next island adventure.

Sunset at Seru Boca

Sunset at Seru Boca

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8 thoughts on “Dushi Curacao

  1. I love reading your blog! I just pretend I’m there! Don’t think I could live on the boat but would enjoy all the islands! Be safe!

    • Thanks! I’m glad you enjoy the posts. Living on a boat definitely has its drawbacks, but it allows us to visit glorious places like this! 🙂

  2. If you’re still there be sure to visit the farmers market and enjoy true native cooking inside under the makeshift canopy cooing in caldrens
    Sherri

  3. Great following yall! Cas Abou and Playa Porto Marie are the two beaches I’ve scoped out online. Let us know if you check them out before you leave!

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